Work Contracts – Win Win Lose http://winwinlose.net/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 06:47:07 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://winwinlose.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-9.png Work Contracts – Win Win Lose http://winwinlose.net/ 32 32 Rimoka CAO says privatization of healthcare services ‘isn’t working’ – Ponoka News https://winwinlose.net/rimoka-cao-says-privatization-of-healthcare-services-isnt-working-ponoka-news/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 02:00:00 +0000 https://winwinlose.net/rimoka-cao-says-privatization-of-healthcare-services-isnt-working-ponoka-news/ Alberta Health Services announced on Jan. 13 that it will outsource retail grocery services to a number of healthcare facilities at some provincial facilities. AHS is seeking responses from third-party retail grocery service providers that are currently provided in-house. The affected sites are: Peter Lougheed Centre, Rockyview General Hospital, Foothills Medical Centre, Alberta Children’s Hospital […]]]>

Alberta Health Services announced on Jan. 13 that it will outsource retail grocery services to a number of healthcare facilities at some provincial facilities.

AHS is seeking responses from third-party retail grocery service providers that are currently provided in-house.

The affected sites are: Peter Lougheed Centre, Rockyview General Hospital, Foothills Medical Centre, Alberta Children’s Hospital and Richmond Road Diagnostic and Treatment Center in Calgary, and University of Alberta Hospital, Royal Alexandra Hospital and Glenrose Rehabilitation Hospital in Edmonton.

“The revenue generated in grocery retail stores does not cover their operating costs, so AHS subsidizes these services with limited healthcare expenses,” said Dr. Verna Yiu, President and CEO of AHS. “Retail food service contracting could generate $3 million per year in revenue used to support core clinical services.”

AHS expects the request-for-response process to take approximately four months.

“Throughout the process, AHS will ensure that decisions are made with quality in mind,” said Mauro Chies, vice president of Cancer Care Alberta and Clinical Support Services, in the press release.

This transition will affect approximately 240 full-time, part-time and casual workers. AHS stated that it was committed to working with these employees and their union during this process. and assumes that there will be employment opportunities with the new providers.

The Alberta Union of Provincial Employees (AUPE) responded quickly.

“While the current plan relates to hospital retail stores, AHS has made it clear that this is also a stepping stone to privatizing inpatient catering services,” AUPE Vice President Darren Graham said in a Jan. 13 press release.

Graham also chairs the union’s anti-privatization committee.

“We are witnessing the greatest threat to our healthcare system in decades – and it is being carried out during a pandemic,” he said.

“This news comes just days after the layoff notices were sent out to the laundry workers. This is clearly part of a broader, multi-fronted attack on Alberta’s public health system, which the government says will affect 11,000 jobs.

“This has nothing to do with saving money, it’s all to do with this administration’s ideological opposition to workers who have fair-paying jobs and benefits,” Graham said.

Lorne Fundytus, CAO of the Rimoka Housing Foundation, said in his experience that the privatization of health care-related services leads to lower quality services as for-profit contractors will always try to cut costs.

In his opinion, “The price is paid by the bottom line and the people who rely on this service.”

Fundytus has a background in commercial manufacturing of cleaning supplies and healthcare services. In addition to chemical manufacturing, he ran a business specializing in the sale and rental of commercial equipment to restaurants, hospitals and retirement homes in central Alberta for over 20 years.

When Red Deer Regional Hospital transitioned to private household services, there was an immediate drop in service quality and facility degradation, he said. Eventually, Fundytus said the hospital switched back to in-house cleaning.

Rimoka owns three senior living properties and manages several other government assets.

While Rimoka is licensed as supportive living accommodation and therefore falls under the healthcare umbrella, the changes do not affect them as they do not have contracts with Alberta Health Services (AHS).

However, it could ultimately affect Rimbey and Ponoka hospitals, he said.

Since Rimoka does not have AHS contracts, it is not bound by their mandates, such as B. The mandatory COVID-19 vaccination of the staff.

Other housing agencies struggling with staff shortages are considering subcontracting food or housekeeping services out of necessity, he said.

While he said he understands why some would choose this route, Rimoka doesn’t outsource services.

“My experience is that it didn’t work,” Fundytus said. “High standards must be met in healthcare.”

Rimoka receives services from Home Care and Family and Community Support Services, but they have no contracts with them. They are able to work with these services to provide their residents with their needs.

HealthcarePonokaRimbey

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Could the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra’s new employment contract be historic? https://winwinlose.net/could-the-cincinnati-symphony-orchestras-new-employment-contract-be-historic/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 09:01:00 +0000 https://winwinlose.net/could-the-cincinnati-symphony-orchestras-new-employment-contract-be-historic/ the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra has a new employment contract with his musicians. The new three-year agreement immediately restores salaries to the level before the pandemic with annual increases of a total of 8% until the end of the contract, restarts the hiring process for vacant positions and changes the work rules significantly. “The pandemic and […]]]>

the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra has a new employment contract with his musicians. The new three-year agreement immediately restores salaries to the level before the pandemic with annual increases of a total of 8% until the end of the contract, restarts the hiring process for vacant positions and changes the work rules significantly.

“The pandemic and societal issues surrounding inclusiveness and equity have accelerated our need to find a new way of working together,” said Jonathan Martin, President and CEO of CSO. “In a collaborative partnership with our musicians, the management negotiation team, led by CSO Chief Operating Officer Robert McGrath, has looked beyond our historical work rules to find common solutions that work in our rapidly evolving environment.”

accession Cincinnati edition To discuss the new contract include CSO Chief Operating Officer Robert McGrath; CSO Associate Principal Viola and Local 1 of the American Federation of Musicians President Paul Frankenfeld; and attorney Barbara Jaccoma, who represents Local 1 of the American Federation of Musicians.

To listen Cincinnati edition live at noon MF. Audio for this segment will be uploaded after 4:00 p.m. ET.

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Public group wants to participate in talks about investigation into alleged ATCO illegality https://winwinlose.net/public-group-wants-to-participate-in-talks-about-investigation-into-alleged-atco-illegality/ Tue, 11 Jan 2022 14:28:54 +0000 https://winwinlose.net/public-group-wants-to-participate-in-talks-about-investigation-into-alleged-atco-illegality/ A group representing private electricity consumers wants a seat in any discussion of alleged illegal behavior by one of Alberta’s major electricity suppliers and is calling on the regulator to release all information about ATCO’s actions. Jim Wachowich, attorney for the Consumers’ Coalition of Alberta, said ATCO was trying to “divert attention” by keeping the […]]]>

A group representing private electricity consumers wants a seat in any discussion of alleged illegal behavior by one of Alberta’s major electricity suppliers and is calling on the regulator to release all information about ATCO’s actions.

Jim Wachowich, attorney for the Consumers’ Coalition of Alberta, said ATCO was trying to “divert attention” by keeping the matter out of the public eye.

“This is a turning point,” said Wachowich.

ATCO said it has already disclosed a lot of information and is working with the commission to resolve the matter.

An overpayment of $ 12 million

In November, the Alberta Utilities Commission’s Enforcement Department requested a hearing on its findings that ATCO Electric had deliberately overpaid a British Columbia First Nation millions to work on a new transmission line.

This was allegedly to secure lucrative contracts for another ATCO company to provide construction storage for the Trans Mountain Expansion oil pipeline project.

Investigators said the company then allegedly tried to pass the $ 12 million overpayment on to Alberta consumers in violation of the law. They alleged that management was aware of the questionable agreement and tried to cover their tracks.

In filings filed with the Commission, the Enforcement Department alleges that the ATCO [its] fundamental duty of honesty and sincerity … the duty on which the entire regulatory system is based. “

ATCO has admitted it made mistakes, saying the overpriced contract was signed to help the First Nation build capacity in a new area of ​​business.

In an October 29 letter to the Commission’s Enforcement Department, the company’s President Melanie Bayley said there was a $ 16 million offer for a settlement.

The letter and other documents recently received by The Canadian Press indicate that investigators and ATCO representatives have agreed to meet before the commission holds formal hearings starting this week.

“Both parties would like the opportunity to hold talks to determine whether and to what extent a solution to the case is possible,” said a letter from a lawyer from the Enforcement Department to the Commission.

Any proposed settlement would have to be approved by the Commission.

However, Wachowich argues that the public must be represented in all conversations involving a regulated utility company.

The biggest document is the one we don’t have.-Jim Wachowich

“Granting us would mean taking the broader public interest into account – we’re not just looking at one side of the equation,” he said.

His group also demands that all information collected by the enforcement department and the ATCO be made public. This also includes the results of an internal company investigation.

“The biggest document is the one we don’t have,” he said.

An internal investigation

Bayley said in an email that it was normal for the Commission’s enforcement department to work on a settlement with a company.

“It’s typical for administrative criminal cases to be handled by a utility company and the [commission] with no involvement of customers or interveners as only the supplier is affected, “wrote Bayley.

Bayley said a number of ATCO documents are already public. She said the company plans to publish the internal investigation at some point, with commercial and personal details being blacked out.

“Again, this is normal in regulatory hearings and is granted by the Commission all the time,” she wrote.

However, ATCO has also argued that some information that has already been released should be removed from the records.

“AUC enforcement has disclosed certain business agreements between unregulated companies that are outside the AUC’s jurisdiction, without their permission and in contravention of the express confidentiality provisions of those agreements,” a letter from the company’s lawyers said.

In another letter to the commission, ATCO Chair Nancy Southern said the overpriced contract was drawn up out of a “deeply rooted and important” respect for indigenous communities.

“This had an important impact on the decisions that were made,” she wrote.

Documents filed by the law enforcement department claimed the First Nation took the ATCO’s check and outsourced the work to another company at a lower price. The same documents that ATCO executives claimed knew was likely to happen.

“At this point, you’re not trying to build capacity, you’re trying to please yourself,” said Wachowich.

Wachowich said the gravity of ATCO’s alleged violation warranted public involvement.

“You violated a very important standard.”

Utilities Commission spokesman Geoff Scotton said there were no prescribed deadlines for resolving the problem.

Investigators have asked the Commission to force ATCO to reimburse the money it received from tariff increases due to the overpriced contract and to impose administrative penalties. These penalties can be up to $ 1 million per day per offense.

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The New York Times reminds us that good liberals are often against unions | Hamilton Nolan https://winwinlose.net/the-new-york-times-reminds-us-that-good-liberals-are-often-against-unions-hamilton-nolan/ Sun, 09 Jan 2022 17:36:00 +0000 https://winwinlose.net/the-new-york-times-reminds-us-that-good-liberals-are-often-against-unions-hamilton-nolan/ ÖOne of the most useful qualities of trade unions is their ability to force good liberals to actually demonstrate their principles in a tangible way. It’s easy for a self-proclaimed progressive business owner to say all the nice things about how they believe in equality and fair wages and workers’ rights – but when their […]]]>

ÖOne of the most useful qualities of trade unions is their ability to force good liberals to actually demonstrate their principles in a tangible way. It’s easy for a self-proclaimed progressive business owner to say all the nice things about how they believe in equality and fair wages and workers’ rights – but when their employees unionize and come to themselves claim those rights, these nice bosses have to stop talking about how nice they are and prove it. For sedan liberals, dealing with unions is where the rubber hits the streets.

Needless to say, many good liberals turn out to be charlatans. There is a saying in the trade union world: “A boss is a boss”. That’s a more succinct way of saying, “A boss is a greedy idiot, no matter how many ‘Still She Stubborn’ bumper stickers they put on their Volvos.”

The New York Times is one of the main totems of mainstream liberalism in America, with expensive coffee and defensive statements for sending your kids to private school. The New York Times, it turns out, is also one of America’s finest examples of how a boss is a boss. For while the newspaper poses about the dangers of inequality and benevolently discusses major trade union movements, the company’s senior executives are eager to undermine their own unions.

Last April, 650 tech workers announced to the New York Times that they were unionizing. Instead of applauding them and negotiating a contract, the company instead refused to voluntarily recognize the union. This is despite its own editorial team Supported a bill that would have made it legally binding for employers to voluntarily accept union proposals if supported by a majority of the workforce.

As the newspaper’s own editorial stated: “Under current law, an employer can refuse the signatures of the majority and insist on a secret ballot. But in a worryingly high number of cases the employer is using the pre-vote period to put pressure on workers to reconsider their union decision. ”Well, this is exactly what the New York Times company is accused of doing to its own employees .

Since last year, the Times has been charged with trying scare Workers to change their minds – to sow division among white-collar workers, divide unity, and undermine support for organized labor. Last week, federal labor inspectorates asserts that the company has broken the law by telling large crowds of employees that they are, in fact, “managers” and that they are therefore prohibited from publicly endorsing the union. (A hearing is scheduled for this March. A Times spokesman said they “strongly disagree” with the union’s allegations.)

If you find this anti-union behavior from the New York Times surprising, remember that another unit of unionized workers from the newspaper who worked for the Wirecutter product rating division had to move on hit during the busy Black Friday shopping weekend to secure a minimally fair deal. So while most of the Times editorial staff has been unionized for decades, the company is still determined to do whatever it takes to prevent more of its employees from getting the same benefits.

I don’t want to get caught up in labor law details and lose sight of the big picture. Here’s how: The New York Times Company, which makes its living branding itself as the main defender of American liberal values, is fighting its own workers who are enforcing their right to unionize and bargain collectively.

That makes the New York Times an anti-union company for me. I can say that without hesitation. Company that not Anti-union will comply with a formal request from their employees for voluntary union recognition; they will negotiate fair contracts that include equal pay for all; and they certainly won’t run internal messaging campaigns to convince their employees that unions are a bad idea.

The New York Times did all of these things recently. This means it can proudly stand up to its dishonorable counterparts across America in this regard. While its authors write against the profound political and economic problems that plague our country, its management is an integral part of those problems.

The New York Times gets away with a lot. They are the journalistic equivalent of the Supreme Court. They offer prestige, big budgets, and job stability at a time when those things are scarce in this industry. The Trump-scared half of our country sees it as an army of truth, and everyone in the media wants to work there. (Call me!) But let’s face it: the people who control the New York Times act like real weasels.

They are not only hypocritical, whine about the common good and act out of pure selfishness – they want both. While outwardly nasty media bosses like Rupert Murdoch may pride themselves on appreciating their reputation as Ayn Randian, those who run the Times want to be accepted as good people at the Brooklyn brownstone cocktail party, even if they quietly try to stop those to prevent those who work from sitting equally at their tastefully laid table. Screw that.

I have reported on hundreds of anti-union campaigns. No matter where they happen, they are all based on lies and fear. Whether they happen at an Amazon warehouse or at the New York Times, they are a display of contempt for the notion that an employee deserves to be treated as someone whose humanity is as real as that of an employer.

Decent people do not participate in union destruction. Anti-union campaigners are not good liberals. Hundreds of workers who raised their voices were not enough to convince the New York Times executives to do the right thing. Maybe it’s time to stop inviting them to cocktail parties.


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Columbia student workers end 10-week strike after reaching deal https://winwinlose.net/columbia-student-workers-end-10-week-strike-after-reaching-deal/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 02:01:13 +0000 https://winwinlose.net/columbia-student-workers-end-10-week-strike-after-reaching-deal/ Columbia University working students on Friday gave their tentative blessings on a new contract that will increase their wages and improve their health services. Those on both sides of the negotiations said they were pleased that the stalemate had ended. “It’s been a really, really long road,” said Lilian Coie, 27, a PhD student in […]]]>

Columbia University working students on Friday gave their tentative blessings on a new contract that will increase their wages and improve their health services.

Those on both sides of the negotiations said they were pleased that the stalemate had ended.

“It’s been a really, really long road,” said Lilian Coie, 27, a PhD student in neurobiology and a member of the Columbia Student Workers Negotiating Committee, which represents approximately 3,000 undergraduate and graduate students. “Even if the agreement is not perfect, we are very satisfied with it.”

In light of the tentative agreement, union officials said that around a third of their members voted to end the strike and that more than 90 percent of voters supported it. A formal vote on the ratification of the four-year treaty is due to take place this month.

In one Explanation, Mary C. Boyce, Provost of Columbia, said, “There is no doubt that this was a challenging time for the university.”

Still, she added: “Everyone involved in collective bargaining shared the common goal of creating a stronger Colombia for those who teach and learn, research, discover and innovate, work and study here.”

“I am optimistic that Columbia will be fully back to normal academic rhythms when the new academic semester begins on January 18,” she said.

The Columbia strike was the latest of its kind at a prominent US university. Working students at New York University agreed on a contract after a spring strike. At Harvard University, a three-day strike ended in late October and a second strike was narrowly avoided the following month after a preliminary settlement was reached.

Tensions at Columbia were high at times during the negotiations. In early December, university officials sent an email to student staff stating that those who don’t return to work within a few days won’t get guaranteed jobs for the spring semester. The workers responded by blocking the campus entrances for a day.

The preliminary contract includes a 6 percent increase for employees with annual contracts and an increase in hourly wages from $ 15 to $ 21. Columbia has also agreed to pay 75 percent of the cost of dental insurance for student workers and to set up a $ 300,000 emergency fund that workers can use out of pocket for medical expenses. The fund is expected to grow in the coming years.

The agreement also enables student staff to seek arbitration by third parties following university investigations into cases of discrimination, harassment, or both. This would allow workers to use investigators or attorneys unrelated to Columbia to evaluate complaints.

The recent strike was the second such action by student workers in Columbia. The first, last spring, ended without a contract and with the resignation of all members of the collective bargaining committee.

“I think there have been a lot of people who felt that we had people off the cliff with our No campaign last spring,” said Ms. Coie. “But we’ve actually made some really, really big improvements over the last tentative agreement.”

Several city officials applauded the deal.

“Student workers are the backbone of Columbia University,” said Mark Levine, president of Manhattan borough, in a statement. “And I’m relieved that the union and the university have finally reached a preliminary agreement that fairly compensates students for their teaching, research and business skills.”

Over the next three weeks, union leaders will contact as many union members as possible to ensure they understand the terms of the agreement before the ratification vote takes place.

“What our members have achieved is impressive,” says Nadeem Mansour, 32, a PhD student in the humanities and member of the collective bargaining committee, “but that’s just the beginning.”


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Exxon Refinery Workers Discuss Contract Dispute Resolution – Union https://winwinlose.net/exxon-refinery-workers-discuss-contract-dispute-resolution-union/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 00:58:00 +0000 https://winwinlose.net/exxon-refinery-workers-discuss-contract-dispute-resolution-union/ United Steelworkers (USW) union members demonstrate outside the Exxon Mobil oil refinery amid a contract dispute in Beaumont, Texas, U.S., May 1, 2021. Exxon locked the approximately 650 unionized workers at the plant on fear of a strike. Photo taken on May 1, 2021. REUTERS / Erwin Seba / File Photo Register now for FREE […]]]>

United Steelworkers (USW) union members demonstrate outside the Exxon Mobil oil refinery amid a contract dispute in Beaumont, Texas, U.S., May 1, 2021. Exxon locked the approximately 650 unionized workers at the plant on fear of a strike. Photo taken on May 1, 2021. REUTERS / Erwin Seba / File Photo

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HOUSTON, Jan. 5 (Reuters) – Exxon Mobil (XOM.N) and United Steelworkers (USW) negotiators meet Thursday to resolve an 8-month lockout at a refinery in Beaumont, Texas. A union representative announced on Wednesday.

The two sides have not met for talks in person since October, shortly after workers turned down the company’s contract offer. The talks also take place after a vote by the US National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) to remove the USW from the plant.

USW International Representative Bryan Gross confirmed the meeting.

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Exxon did not respond to a request for comment. The company has announced that it will end the lockout if the company and the union reach an agreement or if the union is removed through decertification.

Exxon continued to operate the refinery and oil blending facility at 369,000 bpd with supervisors and managers as well as temporary operators. The plant produces gasoline and Mobil 1 engine oil.

The NLRB said on Dec. 29 that it confiscated ballots cast in a decertification vote by 13-243 members of USW Local while investigating complaints about unfair labor practices the union filed against the refinery. The results may only be known after several weeks, said an NLRB spokeswoman.

The board said it was investigating the unions’ charges that the month-long lockout of approximately 600 workers at the plant was used to break the union at the plant and that Exxon had inappropriately supported a campaign to leave unions. Exxon denies the allegations. Continue reading

Officials from USW 13-243 said Exxon’s offer would remove job security for many of its members, while the company said the deal was necessary to operate profitably in low-margin environments.

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Reporting by Erwin Seba; Editing by Aurora Ellis

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.


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The general strike of the Teamsters Local 174 continues after the holiday break | Status https://winwinlose.net/the-general-strike-of-the-teamsters-local-174-continues-after-the-holiday-break-status/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 01:25:00 +0000 https://winwinlose.net/the-general-strike-of-the-teamsters-local-174-continues-after-the-holiday-break-status/ SEATTLE, January 3, 2022 / PRNewswire / – After a brief hiatus over the holidays, the picket lines are back as 330 Teamsters continue to hold work on strike against unfair labor practices. The strike started on November 19th with 34 workers at Gary Merlino Construction but has since escalated into a general strike Gary […]]]>

SEATTLE, January 3, 2022 / PRNewswire / – After a brief hiatus over the holidays, the picket lines are back as 330 Teamsters continue to hold work on strike against unfair labor practices. The strike started on November 19th with 34 workers at Gary Merlino Construction but has since escalated into a general strike Gary Merlino, Stoneway Concrete, Cadman, CalPortland / Glacier, Salmon Bay Sand and Kies, and Lehigh Cement. The workers are all members of Teamsters Local 174 and are on strike in protest of the six companies’ refusal to negotiate in good faith. The contracts have expired since July 31, 2021.

With the holidays in the rearview mirror, the struggle for a fair contract has become even more important. Without concrete, construction projects across the Puget Sound region will quickly run out of work for other construction trades, forcing potentially thousands of workers to be laid off. The widespread impact of employers’ refusal to return to the negotiating table with the Teamsters could devastate the local economy – adding to the impact their arrogance has already had on working families in the US Seattle Area many of which haven’t seen a paycheck in weeks.

The spokesman for the employers’ side, Charlie Oliver of Gary Merlino Construction, hasn’t spoken to the Teamsters in almost six weeks. Meanwhile, contractors working on construction projects across the region are threatening lawsuits if the concrete doesn’t start flowing again soon, despite the National Labor Relations Act and Teamsters ‘expired contracts with companies protecting workers’ right to withhold their work until one Contract comes about. Local politicians have also interfered in the dispute to restart negotiations.

“The arrogance of employers in this case is absolutely astonishing and cannot go on unchecked,” said Teamter’s Local 174 Secretary-Treasurer Rick hicks. “Through Charlie Olivers Inexperience in negotiating and Don Merlinos Refusal to answer the phone, 330 people on strike, 330 families wonder if they will lose health insurance, and thousands more workers laid off and receiving unemployment benefits from the state. We’ve stopped major construction projects, affordable housing projects are losing money they can’t afford, and laid-off families are getting desperate every day. “

“How much damage can a man’s ego do?” Hicks went on. “The Teamsters remain ready to sit down and negotiate in good faith. We are ready to negotiate a fair deal that will treat our members with the same respect they showed other construction professions when negotiating their contracts earlier this year. All we want is fairness. Let’s say Seattle Construction workers ‘interests before the Merlinos’ egos. “

Teamsters Local 174 was founded in 1909 and represents 8,600 working men and women in Seattle and the surrounding areas. “Like” us on Facebook www.facebook.com/TeamstersLocal174.

Contact:

Jamie Fleming, (425) 281-0166

jfleming@teamsters174.org

View the original content to download multimedia:https://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/teamsters-local-174-construction-general-strike-continues-after-holiday-break-301453093.html

SOURCE Teamsters Local 174


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Commissioners will hold hearing to test a new Verizon cell tower near Faith – Salisbury Post https://winwinlose.net/commissioners-will-hold-hearing-to-test-a-new-verizon-cell-tower-near-faith-salisbury-post/ Sun, 02 Jan 2022 05:19:05 +0000 https://winwinlose.net/commissioners-will-hold-hearing-to-test-a-new-verizon-cell-tower-near-faith-salisbury-post/ SALISBURY – At its first meeting in 2022, the Rowan County Board of Commissioners will consider an application to erect a new cell tower southwest of Faith on Monday. The request comes from Cellco Partnership on behalf of Verizon Wireless. The cellular provider is Pending Special Use Permit to house a 165-foot wireless support structure […]]]>

SALISBURY – At its first meeting in 2022, the Rowan County Board of Commissioners will consider an application to erect a new cell tower southwest of Faith on Monday.

The request comes from Cellco Partnership on behalf of Verizon Wireless. The cellular provider is Pending Special Use Permit to house a 165-foot wireless support structure on 24 acres at 280 Rimer Road. Verizon recognized the need to improve coverage and capacity in the Mt. Hope Church Road area near the town of Faith, which the construction of the tower could accomplish.

An identical application was approved by the Board of Commissioners on March 19, 2018, but expired within two years of approval due to the lack of a building permit.

The commissioners will meet at 3:00 p.m. in the J. Newton Cohen Sr. Room on the second floor of the Rowan County Administration Building. The meeting will be broadcast online at https://bit.ly/rowanboc3pmThe password is 028144. The meeting can be joined by calling 602-753-0140, 720-928-9299, 213-338-8477.

Also on the agenda of the meeting:

• Commissioners will consider changing an Incentive Grant with Hexagon Agility to delay the start of the grant period. The company announced in March an expansion of its Salisbury facility that would create 75 new jobs and attract a $ 28 million investment. The company plans to install new equipment as part of the project and add 113,000 square feet to its 204,000 square foot facility.

Hexagon originally estimated that a significant portion of the project would be completed by the end of 2021, but the availability of materials is creating significant delays for the project. Hexagon now estimates December 31, 2023 as the key completion date.

For this reason, Hexagon is requesting the board of directors to move the start of the grant period from fiscal year 2022-23 to fiscal year 2024-25. The grant approved by the commissioners will result in a refund of 75% of the company’s taxes paid to Rowan County over a five-year period.

• The board will consider handing the late Rowan County Master Deputy Billy Marsh’s gun over to his surviving wife, Nicole. Marsh died in October after contracting COVID-19. He has been a full-time deputy in the sheriff’s office since 2015, but has worked there part-time since 2012. In addition to his wife, Marsh leaves a young daughter.

• Commissioners will consider holding a public hearing on January 18 to consider an application to rededicate property owner Jaypal Kalagiri, a cricket ground and private club on his 35.5 acre property in Block 2100 on Glover Road in Salisbury to operate. The application is the reallocation of the land from rural agriculture to rural agriculture with a conditional district to operate the field.

• Commissioners will consider selecting Vector Fleet Management to provide fleet maintenance services for most Rowan County’s vehicles. While the board of directors will review the official contract at a later date, the agreement includes staff with 1.5 positions for management and 2.5 positions for mechanics. The service cost is $ 662,340 for the first year, $ 678,898 for the second year, and $ 695,870 for the third year. Overall, the services will cost $ 2.04 million over three years.

• Commissioners will consider approving an extension of the premium payment until June 25th for first responders who are or may be in direct contact with a person infected with COVID-19. The board first approved the bonus payment in August, August 8 through January 8, which comprised an amount of $ 153.20 per pay period for full-time employees and 10% for part-time employees. The award was for job titles in the Office and Emergency Services Department of the Rowan County Sheriff.

In addition to increasing the salary, the commissioners are also asked to change the positions of Training officer for emergency services, deputy head of telecommunications and head of telecommunications as a recipient of bonuses.

• The board will consider approving amendments to contracts with four different care institutions that provide services to the Ministry of Social Affairs. Each of the original contracts shouldn’t exceed $ 60,000, but since more services are required from each agency, the change would allow the contracts to be increased to no more than $ 160,000.

• Commissioners will consider approving change requests for work by Dellinger in connection with the construction of a chemical booster station. The station is part of the county’s solution to the increased lead levels in the drinking water of some houses in the Dukeville community that rely on Salisbury-Rowan Utilities’s Northeast Water System. In addition to additional metering pump monitoring, the change orders should include a generator and related work. If the change orders are approved, the total cost of the project is $ 819,723.

• The Board of Directors will consider filing a proclamation dated January 17th to Dr. Approve Martin Luther King Jr. Day. The board would normally meet on the 17th, but its second session of the month would be rescheduled to January 18th at 6:00 pm

• Commissioners will consider an application for special-use permission from Russel Woolf and Danielle Soroka to house a 2,400-square-foot residential camp that would be on land diagonally to their home in the Waters Edge neighborhood, near High Rock Lake. The storage room should be used for personal items.


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How the PA’s proposed anti-compensation statute may affect the belt and braces approach to risk transfer in construction contracts | Cohen Seglias Pallas Greenhall & Furman PC https://winwinlose.net/how-the-pas-proposed-anti-compensation-statute-may-affect-the-belt-and-braces-approach-to-risk-transfer-in-construction-contracts-cohen-seglias-pallas-greenhall-furman-pc/ Fri, 31 Dec 2021 14:23:49 +0000 https://winwinlose.net/how-the-pas-proposed-anti-compensation-statute-may-affect-the-belt-and-braces-approach-to-risk-transfer-in-construction-contracts-cohen-seglias-pallas-greenhall-furman-pc/ How the PA’s proposed anti-compensation statute may affect the belt and braces approach to risk transfer in construction contracts In a January 2021 memorandum, Pennsylvania state officials Todd Stevens and Michael Driscoll reintroduced a bill that, if passed, would amend 68 PS Section 491 to significantly restrict the scope of the indemnity provisions in construction […]]]>

How the PA’s proposed anti-compensation statute may affect the belt and braces approach to risk transfer in construction contracts

In a January 2021 memorandum, Pennsylvania state officials Todd Stevens and Michael Driscoll reintroduced a bill that, if passed, would amend 68 PS Section 491 to significantly restrict the scope of the indemnity provisions in construction contracts. As in a. explained previous post, this bill was originally introduced as House Bill 1887 in September 2019, but was eventually “put on the table” in November 2020. According to the Representatives’ memorandum, many Pennsylvania contractors, without compensation, face the unfair practice of being liable for the negligence of another party. On December 13, 2021, this draft law was officially “struck off the table”, ie it is available for possible examination and can soon be added to the house’s calendar.

Reclamation in the case of construction contracts

Building owners and general contractors protect themselves against third-party lawsuits for personal injury or property damage using two methods: contractual compensation arrangements and additionally insured status (ie “belts and suspenders”).

Contractual exemption provisions

Indemnification provisions are used by the parties to transfer the risk of certain losses to another party for losses arising out of the other party’s work. There are three main types of compensation provisions: broad, medium-term and limited.

  1. A comprehensive compensation scheme enables the exemption holder to require the exemption contract to cover the entire liability of the exemption holder, even if the exemption holder suffers damage completely (or “simply” negligently).
  2. An interim compensation scheme enables a person entitled to exemption to be fully compensated by the exemption officer for any damage as long as the exemption recipient has only acted partially negligently.
  3. A limited amount of compensation only demands that the compensation be paid for that part of the damage attributable to the compensation. If it is found that the exemption holder and the exemption officer show 60% and 40% negligence, respectively, the exemption contract only has to cover its share (40%) of the liability.

A broad or medium indemnity clause requires a general contractor or subcontractor to bear the indemnity’s defense costs and any judgments against the indemnity related to its work. For example, if a subcontractor’s employee is injured at work, the employee will likely sue both the general contractor and the project owner. A typical exemption clause between builder and general contractor basically says: “As general contractor you were responsible here, and if someone is injured in the project and sued me, you have to defend me (pay the costs, lawyers) and hold me harmless (for settlements or Paying judgments), also for my own negligence. “

In practice, as soon as a general contractor receives the owner’s claim for compensation, he will (or should) notify his commercial liability insurer (CGL) of the claim. As a result, the owner can indirectly access the general contractor’s CGL policy to cover his damage by first asserting the indemnity claim against the general contractor and then, if necessary, suing the general contractor for contractual indemnification. The same procedure applies to the general contractor demanding compensation from his subcontractor.

Additional insurance status

In addition to the compensation provisions, owners and general contractors will also endeavor to be included in the CGL policies of the general contractor or the subcontractor as an additional insured party. In the above example of an injured worker, the owner, as an additional insured, can apply for insurance coverage under the general contractor’s CGL policy and require the insurance carrier to defend and compensate the owner for the claims of the subcontractor’s employee. This adds further protection to the owner and general contractor, as he, as an additional insured person, has a contractual relationship with the insurance company and direct rights under the applicable CGL policy.

House Bill 424 seeks to ban broad and medium-sized forms of compensation

House Bill 424 seeks to reflect current Delaware, New York, and Ohio laws by prohibiting both broad and medium-sized forms of compensation. This change means the parties are entitled to limited compensation, which effectively removes the belt (compensation) from their belt and suspender toolkit. The current delay in the legislative process relates to the braces in this tool kit: the protection available to one additional insured.

The current version of the bill contains wording that creates confusion about how this could affect the ability of owners and general contractors to continue to obtain additional insurance status under the insurance of general contractors and subcontractors. Trade organization lobbying and negotiations between legislators continue, which in the short term could prevent any movement on the bill. If the law removes both belts and suspenders, it will be a major change that will make it impossible for property owners and general contractors to shift liability for personal injury and property damage “downstream” from contractual provisions.

Conclusion

Cohen Seglias attorneys will continue to monitor any developments that may arise from this legislation. If this legislation is adopted, this legislation will have a significant impact on construction companies operating in Pennsylvania and general contractors and subcontractors alike will need to prepare to comply with the new legislation.


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Mexico’s Pemex awards a $ 1 billion contract for the natural gas processing plant in Ixachi https://winwinlose.net/mexicos-pemex-awards-a-1-billion-contract-for-the-natural-gas-processing-plant-in-ixachi/ Wed, 29 Dec 2021 22:08:20 +0000 https://winwinlose.net/mexicos-pemex-awards-a-1-billion-contract-for-the-natural-gas-processing-plant-in-ixachi/ A joint venture (JV) led by Malaysia’s Coastal Contracts Bhd has won an order worth around USD 1.06 billion from the Mexican state oil company Petróleos Mexicanos (Pemex) for the construction and operation of a natural gas processing plant in the onshore gas and condensate field Ixachi secured in the state of Veracruz. The facility […]]]>

A joint venture (JV) led by Malaysia’s Coastal Contracts Bhd has won an order worth around USD 1.06 billion from the Mexican state oil company Petróleos Mexicanos (Pemex) for the construction and operation of a natural gas processing plant in the onshore gas and condensate field Ixachi secured in the state of Veracruz.

The facility will have the capacity to treat 300 MMcf / d sour wet gas at Ixachi, Pemex’s flagship natural gas development.

The Coastoil Dynamic SA de CV joint venture is a partnership between Coastal and the Mexican Grupo Nuvoil.

Coastal is an integrated provider of oil and gas services and solutions to the shipping industry, listed on the Malaysian Stock Exchange, while Nuvoil is an energy services and solutions provider operating in the upstream and midstream segments.

The EMC Papan facility will provide gas sweetening, dehydration, dew point control and liquefied gas extraction in Ixachi, Coastal said.

Ixachi was discovered by Pemex in 2017 and was Mexico’s third largest natural gas production field in November with an average capacity of 240 MMcf / d. That is below previous Pemex forecaststargeting a peak production of 638.5 MMcf / d by 2022.

Experts like Pablo Medina of Welligence Energy Analytics have identified Ixachi’s technical challenges, namely its extreme depths (3.7 to 4.3 miles) and high pressures.

The scope of work for the EMC Papan contract includes engineering, procurement, construction, and maintenance for the gas processing plant and associated infrastructure. The construction work is expected to take 250 days, and the plant is scheduled to go into operation in the second half of 2022, Coastal announced.

The joint venture commissioned the 180 MMcf / d Perdiz conditioning plant in Ixachi earlier this year, which means that the EMC Papan plant will increase the total capacity in Ixachi to 480 MMcf / d.

The EMP plant in Papan “is seen not only as a strategic project for Pemex, but also for the goal of the Mexican government to supply all Mexicans in the country with gas in the coming years,” said Coastal. “For Pemex, this project is attractive due to its proximity to the existing gas collection, separation and measurement infrastructure as well as to two large pipelines that will allow gas to be transported to central, northern and ultimately [southeastern] Mexico.”

[Trusted Transparency: Mexican buyers and sellers are basing their natural gas prices off of NGI’s Mexico Gas Price Index. Read the analysis of our fifth survey of active players in Mexico, showcasing market-driven insights now.]

Mexico’s state-owned utility Comisión Federal de Electricidad (CFE) and Canada’s TC Energy Corp. have expressed an interest in developing a new offshore gas pipeline from Veracruz to the Yucatán Peninsula, similar to the 2.6 Bcf / d Sur de Texas-Tuxpan pipeline that started operating in 2019.

The company added that Ixachi “will be the most productive onshore field in Mexico once it reaches peak production.”

Octavio Romero Oropeza, CEO of Pemex, said Tuesday that Pemex is committed to increasing its production and processing of wet natural gas and resuming activities in the Lakach deep-sea natural gas field, a project that has been inactive since 2016.

Pemex’s natural gas production was 3.67 billion cf / d in November, compared to 3.59 billion cf / d in the same month last year, according to the upstream regulator Comisión Nacional de Hidrocarburos (CNH).

Pemex reported dry gas production from its processing centers of 2.05 billion cubic feet per day, up from 2.2 billion cubic feet per day for the same period last year.


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