Work Contracts – Win Win Lose http://winwinlose.net/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 18:36:34 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://winwinlose.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-9.png Work Contracts – Win Win Lose http://winwinlose.net/ 32 32 Q3 FY22 Awards Ceremony Recognizes District’s Best > Galveston District > News Stories https://winwinlose.net/q3-fy22-awards-ceremony-recognizes-districts-best-galveston-district-news-stories/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 17:22:18 +0000 https://winwinlose.net/q3-fy22-awards-ceremony-recognizes-districts-best-galveston-district-news-stories/ The ceremony recognized employees for their significant individual and group accomplishments and announced the winners of the district’s Corps Day Awards. Williams and Vail opened the awards ceremony by welcoming Southwest Division Commander Col. Kenneth Reed, who was in the audience making his first official visit to the Galveston District. Vail presented his Command Coin […]]]>

The ceremony recognized employees for their significant individual and group accomplishments and announced the winners of the district’s Corps Day Awards.

Williams and Vail opened the awards ceremony by welcoming Southwest Division Commander Col. Kenneth Reed, who was in the audience making his first official visit to the Galveston District.

Vail presented his Command Coin to several district employees for their outstanding performance in the third quarter. Honoring someone with a Commander’s Token is an instant way for military commanders to show their appreciation for a phenomenal job. More than just a “thank you” or a pat on the back, a commander’s coin is something tangible to remember the occasion.

Vail recognized the following employees with his coin:

  • Jo Ann McCue, a Contracts Department Contract Specialist, for her efforts in managing multiple contracts across the district.
  • James Purcell, Assistant District Counsel, for his work in preparing the district for Hurricane Harvey litigation in the US Court of Federal Claims.
  • Corpus Christi Resident Office Engineer Paul Rodriguez for his service in solving an inadequate US Customs and Border Protection facility.
  • Scott Leimer, director of SWG’s construction management division, on the management of several major construction projects throughout the district.

The district commander then addressed some greetings to three staff members who have caused a stir in their respective offices:

  • Rick Elizondo of the Corpus Christi Resident Office for his mentoring and expertise in administering the Corpus Christi Ship Channel CIP 2 contract.
  • Joshua Mahon of the Contracting Division for taking on several key contracting activities and awarding the $13 million hydrographic mapping and surveying contract.
  • Amanda Crawford of the Resource Management Division for assisting the entire district with the evaluation and planning process, assisting employees with their time and attendance entries, travel orders, travel vouchers, training courses and ordering supplies.

At the venue, Vail then presented two cash awards—both $500—to SWG Public Affairs Office members Francisco “Paco” Hamm and Carlos Gomez. Both were recognized for their efforts in managing multiple internal and external communication channels and educating the public about several important high-visibility SWG projects along the Texas coast.

The SWG Regulatory Division then honored its members with their own special recognition. The Regulatory Peer Awards were created by the staff of the department for the staff to allow the regulatory team to recognize the efforts of their peers.

This year’s Regulatory Team Award went to Brad Dawe for exemplifying the essence of teamwork. Dawe was quoted as “always thinking of others and doing whatever it takes to contribute to the regulatory mission”.

The winner of the Regulatory Marie C. Pattillo Custer Service Award was Andria Davis. Davis was recognized for her professional courtesy and willingness to participate in anything that conveyed the Regulatory Program’s mission.

Marie Taylor was named “Regulator of the Year” in 2022. Taylor’s leadership and communication skills were recognized by her department and described as “an asset to the Galveston District and the US Army Corps of Engineers.”

Vail and Williams then presented a certificate of achievement to a group of Contracting Division employees: Bernice Taylor; Arnette Rose; and Bryan Williams. The group received special recognition for completing the cost-sharing control protocol for the Corpus Christi-LaQuinta Expansion Ship Canal feasibility study. The efforts of Taylor, Rose and Williams were instrumental in implementing a solution to a USACE-wide problem in the contracting process.

Several personnel were subsequently awarded the Army Civilian Service Achievement Medal:

  • Kecha Bray-Coleman was recognized for her achievement as a civil engineering technician in the Border Infrastructure Resident Office’s Rio Grande Valley program.
  • Pablo Hernandez was recognized for his efforts as the Border Infrastructure Resident Office’s Rio Grande Valley Program area engineer.
  • Robert “Niles” Hooper, Nick Laskowksi, Jon Loxley and Rick Villagomez were recognized for their contributions to the Gulf Coast Protection District partnership, which culminated in the signing of the Orange County Project Partnership Agreement on April 29, 2022.
  • Tasha Metz was recognized for her performance as a member of the aquaculture reinforcement team and for coordinating with federal, state and tribal partners on controversial shellfish permitting actions.

Three other members of the Galveston District were subsequently awarded the Army Civilian Service Commendation Medal.

  • Alberto Hinojosa and Ramon Navarro were recognized for their performance as Supervising Engineers for the Border Infrastructure Resident Office Rio Grande Valley program.
  • Michael Roberts was recognized for his work as a civil engineer for the Border Infrastructure Resident Office Rio Grande Valley program.

The nominees for the 2022 SWG Corps Day Awards were announced after the Service Medals ceremony. Although the district’s Corps Day celebrations had to be postponed, Vail and Williams insisted on publicly recognizing SWG’s outstanding employees.

dr Patrick Kerr, Head of Coastal Engineering at SWG, received this year’s Supervisor of the Year award.

“Patrick is an excellent manager and leader,” Vail said, noting the heavy responsibility Kerr’s department oversees given the district’s recent coastal projects. “It’s not an easy task, and he does it all with great humility and dedication.”

dr Shahidul Islam was named Galveston District’s “Innovator of the Year.” Islam’s work in preparing a technical plan to assist the Texas General Land Office in a regional flood planning study — an investment of $85 million — has been called a “major improvement” in the state’s efforts to mitigate flood planning.

“To me, this award is very important,” Williams said of the district’s highest honors for innovators. “The engineers and supervisors will make sure we get the job done, but the innovators are the ones who will move us forward in the future.”

Jesus Galindo won the STEM Volunteer of the Year award. Galindo is heavily involved in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) activities in his community, particularly in the Faculty of Civil Engineering at Lamar University. His connections with students have been cited as an example of STEM careers and service to others.

“This will undoubtedly generate increased interest in future careers with the US Army Corps of Engineers,” Vail said, while gently reminding Galindo what to do when he goes back to Lamar University.

dr Himangshu Das was recognized as the district’s Engineer of the Year. This led the technical effort behind the Coastal Texas Study, the largest study in USACE history.

“HD – as we call him – is undoubtedly our coastal engineering expert here in Galveston,” said Vail. “I can’t tell you how often I receive inquiries from across the company and from the private sector asking for his services. That’s the kind of level that HD is at.”

Ron Wooten was named Galveston District’s 2022 Employee of the Year. Wooten’s efforts as an outreach specialist have been recognized within the district, at Southwest Division headquarters, with various non-federal partners, members of Congress and outside agencies. His positive and courteous demeanor, responsiveness, and attentiveness to all offices throughout the district were instrumental in his nomination, according to the award.

“Just to give you an idea of ​​who Ron is, he just apologized to everyone on this stage for winning the award,” Williams said to laughter and applause from the crowd in attendance.

Vail also recognized the district’s “Heroes of the Week” for the quarter:

  • Ryan Schwartzengraber, for the week of April 1st.
  • Carlos Gomez, for the week of April 15th.
  • Pat Agee, for the week of April 29th.
  • Pamela Thibodeaux, for the week of May 13th.
  • Philip Hejduk, for the week of May 27th.
  • Michael Higgs, for the week of Oct.

The awards ceremony was followed by a town hall meeting at which Reed formally introduced himself to the district and shared his leadership philosophy and expectations as the new division commander. [To read about the townhall, click here.]

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Bombardier union workers ratify new employment contract https://winwinlose.net/bombardier-union-workers-ratify-new-employment-contract/ Thu, 23 Jun 2022 01:03:00 +0000 https://winwinlose.net/bombardier-union-workers-ratify-new-employment-contract/ MONTREAL, June 22 (Reuters) – Bombardier Inc (BBDb.TO) said on Wednesday workers at a key program for the Canadian business jet maker have ratified a new employment contract that will include wage increases of up to 18.5% over five years will bring. The Montreal-based company is one of several in the aerospace industry grappling with […]]]>

MONTREAL, June 22 (Reuters) – Bombardier Inc (BBDb.TO) said on Wednesday workers at a key program for the Canadian business jet maker have ratified a new employment contract that will include wage increases of up to 18.5% over five years will bring.

The Montreal-based company is one of several in the aerospace industry grappling with labor disputes around the world as demand for travel rebounds from the COVID-19 pandemic and soaring prices push unions to demand bigger wage increases .

The new contract will employ an estimated 1,800 workers, mostly producing Bombardier’s popular Challenger business jets, which accounted for a third of the company’s deliveries in 2021. read more

Sign up now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com

Companies from Bombardier to some European airlines are facing wage disputes with workers amid rising inflation, contributing to rising cost pressures and discontent as the summer travel season begins. Continue reading

Inflation in Canada accelerated to 7.7% in May, the highest rate since January 1983. read more

In the United States, pilots at almost every major airline are protesting, demanding higher wages and contract improvements because of “tiring” flight schedules.

Aviation has been battered during the COVID pandemic, with an estimated 2.3 million jobs lost worldwide, compounding existing workforce shortages. While workers are coming back, there is clout to employees like pilots during the talks.

“Workers have a lot of power right now and they have inflation in their own lives,” said Richard Aboulafia, executive director of AeroDynamic Advisory. “And in the case of aviation, a lot of them have recently been laid off or furloughed, so they don’t feel a lot of loyalty.”

Cabin crew at low-cost airline Ryanair (RYA.I) in Spain and Portugal plan to go on strike on Friday, and work stoppages are expected elsewhere in Europe. Continue reading

Countries around the world are grappling with high inflation as hot demand meets supply chain constraints and Russia’s invasion of Ukraine pushes commodity prices sharply higher.

Aboulafia said aerospace sectors like defense and cargo could more easily pass rising costs on to customers. Airlines are more vulnerable as they risk losing demand if air fares rise.

“My big fear with all of this is that as the defense gets used to paying more, you could see some sort of crowding out and that’s going to affect advertising because they’re going to have a harder time matching,” Aboulafia said.

The International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers, which in April reached a settlement on “historic pay rises” for 5,000 Lockheed Martin Corp (LMT.N) workers in Fort Worth, Texas, has opened talks with the defense of Boeing Co ( BA.N) recorded unit.

The union has also negotiated a new contract for Southwest Airlines Co (LUV.N) customer service staff after reaching a tentative agreement twice. The latest agreement, rejected by workers in the South West in May, included a 15% pay rise over three years and a signing bonus.

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Additional reporting by Rajesh Kumar Singh in Chicago and Akriti Sharma in Bengaluru; Adaptation by Deepa Babington and Leslie Adler

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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Xi Jinping, China’s chief career planning officer? https://winwinlose.net/xi-jinping-chinas-chief-career-planning-officer/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 06:08:00 +0000 https://winwinlose.net/xi-jinping-chinas-chief-career-planning-officer/ Placeholder when loading item promotions In the next few weeks, China will produce a record 10.8 million college graduates. Finding jobs is an unexpected headache for President Xi Jinping’s administration, which is struggling with citywide lockdowns to contain outbreaks of Covid-19. The outlook is so bleak that some universities are urging seniors to delay graduating. […]]]>
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In the next few weeks, China will produce a record 10.8 million college graduates. Finding jobs is an unexpected headache for President Xi Jinping’s administration, which is struggling with citywide lockdowns to contain outbreaks of Covid-19.

The outlook is so bleak that some universities are urging seniors to delay graduating. Students complained to Caixin that they were not allowed to defend their thesis unless they found a job. Some have been forced to declare themselves “self-employed” just to get their diploma. As of April, less than half of the graduating class had received job offers, according to online recruitment site Zhaopin Inc.

State-funded universities are under strong political pressure. In May, urban youth unemployment hit a record 18.4%. By July, the peak of the closing season, it could hit 23%, according to Bank of America Merrill Lynch estimates. Therefore, universities must do their part to keep this number low. Finally, tight Covid controls at the expense of rising youth unemployment are not looking good for Xi, who is expected to win an unprecedented third term later this year.

New university graduates are increasingly hoping that the state will be able to place their first jobs. State-owned companies are the most desirable positions, while only 17.4% of the class of 2022 would like to work for a private company, according to the latest Zhaopin survey.

But the state doesn’t want to offer that. Since the late 1990s, SOEs have reduced the number of new hires, halving the number of city workers to only about 55 million. Jobs in the public sector are also in demand, but the number of new hires is stable at around 170,000 per year.

Instead, the private sector has become China’s largest employer in the past decade, employing some 150 million urban workers. There are also more than 110 million self-employed people in cities who take on part-time jobs, odd jobs or jobs in the gig economy. Some managed to become social media influencers.

In a clear sign of how scarce urban jobs have become, the southwestern province of Yunnan recently offered an annual grant of 50,000 yuan ($7,464) per person to new college graduates to work in rural villages. Some netizens joked that it was a repeat of the 1968 Rural Rural Movement, when Mao Zedong sent privileged urban youth to remote areas to learn from peasants.

Whether Yunnan can deliver is unclear. The grant is no small sum — it would be about five months of the average starting salary for elite Tsinghua University graduates.

Two years ago, China’s labor market recovered quickly from the initial outbreak of the pandemic. There wasn’t much economic trauma back then. Only a small area around Wuhan, Covid Ground Zero, was affected. Within three months life was back to normal.

The labor market is currently not that resilient. Years of tech crackdowns have wiped out much of the demand for young, educated, and internet-savvy workers. Shanghai and Beijing – which have produced 18 of the top 20 schools with the highest graduate salaries – have been grappling with Covid outbreaks since April.

Meanwhile, the skyrocketing college admissions rate over the past decade is producing a workforce that is increasingly incompatible with what the economy needs. New graduates now account for more than half of the new labor supply, estimates HSBC Holdings Plc. Literature and art are among the most popular majors.

During his reign, Xi has raised the economic status of state-owned enterprises and cracked down on the private sector’s “disorderly capital expansion.” Well, he got more than he wished for. Young people, drawn to the state’s reputation and financial security, now wish its government could offer jobs. Aside from becoming president for life, maybe Xi could also become China’s chief career planning officer?

More from this author and others at Bloomberg Opinion:

• China’s big problem that Xi Jinping can’t solve: Shuli Ren

• Do we owe Gen Z for their Covid misery?: Chris Bryant

• Feeling stuck at a salary of $250,000? Just wait: Alexis Leondis

This column does not necessarily represent the opinion of the editors or of Bloomberg LP and its owners.

Shuli Ren is a columnist for Bloomberg Opinion covering Asian markets. A former investment banker, she was a market reporter at Barron’s. She is a CFA charterholder.

More stories like this are available on bloomberg.com/opinion

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Pa newspaper’s union struggle brings certainty to negotiations https://winwinlose.net/pa-newspapers-union-struggle-brings-certainty-to-negotiations/ Fri, 17 Jun 2022 22:15:00 +0000 https://winwinlose.net/pa-newspapers-union-struggle-brings-certainty-to-negotiations/ By Matthew Santoni (June 17, 2022 at 6:15 p.m. EDT) — The Third Circuit’s removal of decades-old precedent that allowed “implicit” provisions to survive the expiration of an employment contract has long given the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette one big win – smoldering clash with his unions, but lawyers say both sides of the negotiating table will […]]]>
By Matthew Santoni (June 17, 2022 at 6:15 p.m. EDT) — The Third Circuit’s removal of decades-old precedent that allowed “implicit” provisions to survive the expiration of an employment contract has long given the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette one big win – smoldering clash with his unions, but lawyers say both sides of the negotiating table will benefit from the opportunity to set clearer terms.

The decision of a three-judge panel in Pittsburgh Mailers Union Local 22 v. PG Publishing Co. overturned the 1994 decision of the Ludens v. Local Union No. 1994 court. 6 that allowed portions of an expired contract not expressly rejected to survive as “implied” if the parties otherwise proceeded as if the contract…

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Cowboys want homegrown players like Dalton Schultz but struggled to get deals – Dallas Cowboys Blog https://winwinlose.net/cowboys-want-homegrown-players-like-dalton-schultz-but-struggled-to-get-deals-dallas-cowboys-blog/ Wed, 15 Jun 2022 14:32:05 +0000 https://winwinlose.net/cowboys-want-homegrown-players-like-dalton-schultz-but-struggled-to-get-deals-dallas-cowboys-blog/ FRISCO, Texas — Negotiations between the Dallas Cowboys and tight end Dalton Schultz so far have been cordial if not overly productive. After skipping the last week of voluntarily organized team activities, Schultz attended Tuesday’s mandatory minicamp as the clock approaches July 15, when teams must either agree to a multi-year deal or he can […]]]>

FRISCO, Texas — Negotiations between the Dallas Cowboys and tight end Dalton Schultz so far have been cordial if not overly productive.

After skipping the last week of voluntarily organized team activities, Schultz attended Tuesday’s mandatory minicamp as the clock approaches July 15, when teams must either agree to a multi-year deal or he can start the season with the 10.9 million Dollar Franchise Tag will play .

While the Schultz situation might not be the perfect case study, it does speak to a question the Cowboys have been trying to answer: Why couldn’t they re-sign their own players for early overtime?

Schultz conforms to the Cowboys’ stated desire to keep their own rather than play in the deep end of the free agency pool. Over the past two years, the 2019 fourth-round pick has caught 141 passes for 1,423 yards and 12 touchdowns. Last season, he joined Jason Witten as the only tight end in franchise history with at least 75 receptions for 800 yards and eight touchdowns in a single season.

But he caught 13 passes in his first two seasons, so there was no point in going through with a long-term offer. Additionally, a team that has traditionally been aggressive in pursuing long-term deals with its own players has begun to sit back.

Executive Vice President Stephen Jones attributes that to a number of factors: uncertainty surrounding the collective bargaining agreement, media deals and the pandemic. The Cowboys also had to negotiate with quarterback Dak Prescott, which resulted in a four-year, $160 million contract.

“This time last year, I don’t know if we knew we were going to have full stadiums or not,” Jones said. “If we didn’t have full stadiums, that would have a huge impact on the salary cap. Now it looks like things are going back to business as usual.”

Considering he made just over $4.4 million in his first four years, that’s $10.9 million a day for Schultz. But he sees what the Cleveland Browns paid their franchise tight end David Njoku (four years, $57 million, $28 million guaranteed).

Without a middle ground agreement, in 2023 the Cowboys can simply reuse the franchise tag for Schultz and pay him just over $13 million should he produce for a third straight season. Or they could choose to walk away and let him test the free hand while hoping this year’s fourth-round pick Jake Ferguson can take on and add another tight end through the draft or free hand.

“The importance of the second contract that every GM and every capman in this league is trying to fulfill is the ability to get second contracts,” said coach Mike McCarthy. “You get to a point in a man’s career — 26, 27 years old — where they’re in their physical prime.”

There was a time when the cowboys didn’t sweat making deals like this.

In his prime, Witten never came close to hitting the open market. Neither CB Terence Newman, DE DeMarcus Ware nor QB Tony Romo. The Cowboys later worked out deals with the likes of OT Tyron Smith (2014), C. Travis Frederick (2016), OG Zack Martin (2018), and OL La’el Collins (2017, 2019).

While cash layouts were favorable to the player and paid at or near the top of the market, the Cowboys were able to hold longer contracts, allowing them some salary cap flexibility by restructuring those contracts multiple times. In 2014, Smith signed an eight-year extension that tied him to the Cowboys through 2023.

“You’ve seen other teams shorten terms more now than they have in the past,” said an agent who has dealt with the Cowboys on many multi-year contracts. “You don’t want to do it like that.”

Jones acknowledged that the length of the deals has been an advantage for the Cowboys, who have leaned more on the label in recent years.

In 2018 and 2019, defensive end DeMarcus Lawrence played on the franchise tag before they eventually signed him to a five-year, $105 million deal that included $65 million in guaranteed money.

Prescott waited (2019) and waited (2020) before getting the deal he wanted and $126 million guaranteed. The Cowboys thought they were close to a deal early in the 2019 season, but it never materialized. Prescott played the 2020 season with a $31.4 million franchise tag, and even after suffering a compound fracture and dislocation of his ankle that season, he was able to obtain the desired contract structure that would allow him to theoretically to come onto the market at 30 years old.

Prescott wanted a four-year contract. The Cowboys wanted at least five. In the end, Prescott signed a six-year contract, which lapsed to four years. Even with the new media contracts’ salary cap hikes looming over the next few seasons, the Cowboys could look to extend Prescott’s contract by giving him more guaranteed money while lowering their annual quarterback cap.

Patience is a difficult thing for players who want a big payday.

“It just lingers there,” Martin said. “You just think about it a lot. When you’re ready for your contract and you know they’re talking and discussing it, it’s hard not to think about it a lot.”

Risk is not eliminated by signing players for lucrative contract renewals before their contracts expire.

Running back Ezekiel Elliott held out from training camp in 2019 before signing a six-year, $90 million extension that included $50 million in guaranteed money. But Elliott’s production has declined over the past two years, although last year’s drop may be related to a partial cruciate ligament rupture in his right knee, which he sustained earlier in the season.

The Cowboys also signed Collins and linebacker Jaylon Smith to lucrative extensions. But Collins missed the 2020 season with a hip injury and was suspended for five games in 2021 for violating a substance abuse policy. With the guaranteed money in his deal voided, he was fired this offseason and expects to cap at $4.9 million this year. Meanwhile, Smith failed to reach the same level as in 2018 and was dropped four games into the season last year. He’s still counting $6.8 million against the cap this season.

“I think the deals for Zeke and Jaylon really freaked her out,” the agent said.

“You won’t hit everyone,” Jones said. “I don’t know anyone who has. But you have to hope you’re right a lot more than you’re wrong.”

Who is next for the cowboys and what is the cost? After this season, receiver CeeDee Lamb and cornerback Trevon Diggs are eligible for contract extensions for the first time, although the Cowboys may give Lamb a fifth-year option for 2024, buying her a year but also potentially increasing costs if Lamb succeeds in her Recipient #1.

During this offseason, wide receivers Tyreek Hill, Davante Adams, Cooper Kupp and AJ Brown signed overtime contracts averaging at least $25 million per season.

Diggs is coming off a season with 11 interceptions, the most by a Cowboy since 1981. A second-round pick in 2020, he is scheduled to be a free agent after the 2023 season. The Cowboys could use the franchise tag on him or sign him to a long-term contract.

Three cornerbacks — Jaire Alexander, Denzel Ward, and Jalen Ramsey — are currently making at least $20 million a season. Alexander has five career interceptions; Ward has 10 and Ramsey has 15. Diggs has 14 in his first two seasons.

“Contracts made always have an impact,” Jones said. “That’s a fact. To what extent, that varies, but always when a contract is made [elsewhere], it is considered and can affect how you rate a player. … That’s the nature of a cap.”

Having players they want to keep is a good thing.

“Better hope you have that kind of ‘problem’ because if you don’t, you’re going to have to go freelance,” Jones said. “When you draw right, you beg for that kind of success.”

Incidentally, Micah Parsons is eligible for an extension after the 2023 season.

How much will that cost?

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Who would take over Edmonton Oilers defenseman Oscar Klefbom’s contract? https://winwinlose.net/who-would-take-over-edmonton-oilers-defenseman-oscar-klefboms-contract/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 18:00:58 +0000 https://winwinlose.net/who-would-take-over-edmonton-oilers-defenseman-oscar-klefboms-contract/ All signs clearly point to the Edmonton Oilers attempting to clear Cap Space. It is a necessity at this point. Edmonton have a number of players to sign and a number of holes to fill. Zack Kassian is likely to buy out or trade, and I think there’s enough market for a puck-moving, right-shot defender […]]]>

All signs clearly point to the Edmonton Oilers attempting to clear Cap Space. It is a necessity at this point.

Edmonton have a number of players to sign and a number of holes to fill. Zack Kassian is likely to buy out or trade, and I think there’s enough market for a puck-moving, right-shot defender in Tyson Barrie. He’s just a luxury the Oilers can’t afford.

But what happens to Oscar Klefbom’s contract?

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“My expectation is that next year we’ll be in LTI with Krefbom,” Oilers GM Ken Holland said, adding that as of last year’s deadline, he had to close deals where Montreal paid the salary for Brett Kulak and Philadelphia for Derick picked up Brassard. “That’s the reality I’m looking at at the close of trade next year because I don’t expect Klef to play.”

When asked about trading the contract, Holland stated that you only get cap space at the close because cap space accrues throughout the season.

In theory, the Oilers could undoubtedly postpone the Klefbom contract. His deal is in its final season and could help teams like Arizona, Buffalo, Detroit or Anaheim hit the cap floor.

However, there is a small crease that complicates matters. While his cap hit is $4.167 million, his salary owed is $5.169 million. That’s an expensive price for a team like Arizona, which has announced it would be willing to accept contracts but has less revenue. Might Detroit be ready to step up?

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Either way, it won’t be an easy clearing. Despite slightly different circumstances, the Toronto Maple Leafs were forced to defer a first-round pick to get out of the final year of Patrick Marleau’s contract.

Daily Faceoffs Frank Seravalli listed the Oscar Klefbom contract as the 20th asset on his first list of off-season trade targets.

It’s worth noting that the Oilers don’t have any picks in the second, third, or fourth round as of today. Reading the tea leaves, it seems to me like the Oilers might have a hard time getting out of this LTIR jam. And the other question remains: would it be worth it?

As Holland mentioned, it might create some space for the team around the deadline, but that’s about it. The Oilers don’t have any mid-round assets likely to be moved into these kinds of deals, so maybe a team would consider a prospect like Dmitri Samorukov as a sweetie? What about Tyson Barrie? Who knows.

I have no hopes that the Oilers can move Klefboms LTIR.


Zach Laing is the news director and senior columnist for The Nation Network. You can follow him on Twitter at @zjlaingor reachable by email at [email protected]

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Home Depot wins ruling denying right to wear BLM at work (1) https://winwinlose.net/home-depot-wins-ruling-denying-right-to-wear-blm-at-work-1/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 21:33:45 +0000 https://winwinlose.net/home-depot-wins-ruling-denying-right-to-wear-blm-at-work-1/ A complaint by the US Chamber of Labor prosecutors against it Home Depot Inc. — for allegedly interfering with workers’ rights to protest racial harassment — should be sacked, an agency judge ruled on Friday. The General Counsel of the US National Labor Relations Board had done so allegedly that the company violated the federal […]]]>

A complaint by the US Chamber of Labor prosecutors against it Home Depot Inc. — for allegedly interfering with workers’ rights to protest racial harassment — should be sacked, an agency judge ruled on Friday.

The General Counsel of the US National Labor Relations Board had done so allegedly that the company violated the federal Labor Code by preventing employees from putting the Black Lives Matter message on their aprons and by threatening and punishing employees to discourage collective action.

The NLRB declined to comment. A Home Depot representative did not immediately respond to a query. The Atlanta-based home improvement retailer has said the agency “misrepresents the relevant facts” and that it is “fully committed to diversity and respect for all people.”

The federal labor law protects the right of workers, with or without a union, to participate in collective action to improve working conditions. In the Home Depot case and another against Amazon.com Inc.‘s Whole Foods Market, the agency’s general counsel argued that employers had violated that law by banning employees from wearing Black Lives Matter messages on their clothing.

In his verdict on Friday administrative judge Paul Boga wrote that Black Lives Matter messaging “does not have an objective and sufficiently direct relationship to employment conditions” to be legally protected.

The message “was created and is used primarily to address the unjustified killings of black people by law enforcement and vigilantes,” he wrote. “To the extent that the message is used for broader purposes, it functions as a political umbrella for societal concerns and relates to the workplace only in the sense that jobs are part of society.”

Whole Foods has denied wrongdoing in its case, which is being reviewed by a San Francisco-based judge in an ongoing trial.

Agency judges’ decisions can be appealed to Washington-based Labor Board members, now majority Democrats, and from there in federal courts.

(Updates to include details of the verdict.)

To contact the reporter on this story:
Josh Eidelson in Palo Alto at jeidelson@bloomberg.net

To contact the editors responsible for this story:
John J Edwards III at jedwardsiii1@bloomberg.net

Jonathan Roeder

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Non-Disparagement Clauses Enforceable in New Jersey Employment Settlement Agreements https://winwinlose.net/non-disparagement-clauses-enforceable-in-new-jersey-employment-settlement-agreements/ Wed, 08 Jun 2022 14:25:42 +0000 https://winwinlose.net/non-disparagement-clauses-enforceable-in-new-jersey-employment-settlement-agreements/ Source: Saiber Labor Law Alert Although New Jersey clearly prohibited non-disclosure provisions in employment contracts and settlement agreements in 2019 NJSA 10:5-12.8 regarding claims of discrimination, retaliation, or harassment, there was an open question as to whether this prohibition extended to non-disparagement clauses. The Appeals Division has now answered this question in the negative in […]]]>

Source: Saiber Labor Law Alert

Although New Jersey clearly prohibited non-disclosure provisions in employment contracts and settlement agreements in 2019 NJSA 10:5-12.8 regarding claims of discrimination, retaliation, or harassment, there was an open question as to whether this prohibition extended to non-disparagement clauses. The Appeals Division has now answered this question in the negative in a recently published decision.

in the Savage vs Parish Neptune, No. A-1415-20 (App. Div. May 31, 2022), plaintiff Christine Savage worked as a police officer with the Neptune Police Department. In 2016, she filed a lawsuit against the Neptune Police Department and other defendants, alleging relevant portions of sexual harassment, gender discrimination, and retaliation under the Anti-Discrimination Act. The parties settled the lawsuit in 2020. The settlement agreement contained a non-disparagement clause, in which the parties agreed “not to make any written or oral representations. . . in relation to the past conduct of the parties, statements of which would tend to denigrate or attack a party’s reputation.”

Just days after receiving her settlement payment, the plaintiff took part in an interview with an NBC news reporter in which she made comments about how she was abused and oppressed at work, that the Neptune Police Department “doesn’t want women there” and that The workplace culture “hasn’t changed” and has remained a “good old system”. The defendants then filed a motion to enforce the settlement agreement, arguing that the plaintiff’s statements during the NBC interview violated the non-libel provision.

First, the Appellate Division rejected the plaintiff’s argument that the non-defamation provision had been violated NJSA 10:5-12.8(a) because the law does not apply to non-disparagement clauses. The court recognized that there is a difference between a non-disclosure provision prohibited by law and a non-libel provision. The former prohibits the parties from disclosing facts related to the court proceeding and/or the settlement agreement, while the latter prohibits the parties from communicating anything negative about each other. The court held that the legislature could have prohibited the enforcement of non-denigration provisions but did not, leading the court to conclude that the omission was notable. The court ruled that “the plain language of the law suggests that it was intended only to prevent employers from forcing workers into agreements to obscure the details of their LAD claims.”

Although the court ruled that the parties’ non-disparagement clause was enforceable, it ultimately found that the plaintiff had not breached its terms. The non-disparagement clause expressly prohibited the parties from “making any written or oral representations . . . regarding the past behavior of the partieswhat statements would tend to disparage or attack a party’s reputation.” (emphasis added). The court ruled that the plaintiff’s statements that women were “oppressed,” that the department “didn’t want women there,” and that the department “hadn’t changed” would not change and was “the good old boy system.” to the accused currently and future Behavior. As such, these comments did not fall within the scope of the non-disparagement clause.

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China May service contracts for the third consecutive month https://winwinlose.net/china-may-service-contracts-for-the-third-consecutive-month/ Mon, 06 Jun 2022 01:54:00 +0000 https://winwinlose.net/china-may-service-contracts-for-the-third-consecutive-month/ Employees are seen silhouetted at a restaurant following a ban on dine-in services amid the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in the central business district (CBD) of Beijing, China, 2 June 2022. REUTERS/Tingshu Wang Sign up now for FREE unlimited access to Reuters.com to register BEIJING, June 6 (Reuters) – China’s service activities shrank […]]]>

Employees are seen silhouetted at a restaurant following a ban on dine-in services amid the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in the central business district (CBD) of Beijing, China, 2 June 2022. REUTERS/Tingshu Wang

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BEIJING, June 6 (Reuters) – China’s service activities shrank for the third straight month in May, pointing to a slow recovery despite the easing of some COVID lockdowns in Shanghai and neighboring cities, a private business survey showed on Monday.

Caixin’s Services Purchasing Managers’ Index (PMI) rose to 41.4 in May from 36.2 in April, rising slightly as authorities began lifting some of the tough restrictions that have paralyzed financial hub Shanghai and disrupted global supply chains to have.

However, the reading remained well below the 50-point mark that separates growth from contraction on a monthly basis.

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Analysts say weakness in the service sector, which accounts for about 60% of China’s economy and half of city jobs, is likely to persist under the government’s zero-COVID policy, with contact-intensive sectors like hotels and restaurants bearing the brunt.

An official survey on Tuesday also showed that the service sector is still in contraction.

The Caixin survey showed that new business, including new export orders, fell for the fourth straight month in May as mobility restrictions kept customers at home and disrupted operations.

This prompted service firms to cut payrolls more, with a sub-index for employment coming in at 48.5, its lowest since February last year and down from 49.3 the previous month.

Official data showed that China’s nationwide survey-based unemployment rate rose to 6.1% in April, the highest level since February 2020 and well above the government’s 2022 target of below 5.5%.

“The employment measure has been in declining territory since the beginning of this year. The effects of the epidemic have hit the labor market. Companies weren’t very motivated to increase hiring. As a result, outstanding deals (backlogs) in the service sector continued to grow,” said Wang Zhe, senior economist at Caixin Insight Group.

China’s economic activity slowed sharply in April as the country grappled with the worst COVID-19 outbreak since 2020.

In a bid to stabilize the situation in a politically sensitive year, China’s cabinet recently announced a package of 33 measures covering fiscal, financial, investment and industrial policies, although analysts say the official GDP target of around 5, 5% without easing the zero COVID strategy.

“Policymakers need to pay more attention to employment and logistics. Removing obstacles in supply and industrial chains and promoting work and production resumption will help stabilize market entities and protect the labor market,” added Wang of the Caixin Insight Group. They should also issue subsidies to people whose incomes are affected by COVID.

Caixin’s composite PMI for May, which includes both manufacturing and services activities, rose to 42.2 from 37.2 in the previous month. Factory activity fell less sharply in May but still posted the second-biggest drop since February 2020, suggesting a recovery remains fragile.

The Caixin PMI is compiled by S&P Global from questionnaire responses sent to purchasing managers in China.

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Reporting by Stella Qiu and Ryan Woo; Edited by Kim Coghill

Our standards: The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.

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The teachers at the Old Town School of Folk Music reach a contract https://winwinlose.net/the-teachers-at-the-old-town-school-of-folk-music-reach-a-contract/ Fri, 03 Jun 2022 23:43:00 +0000 https://winwinlose.net/the-teachers-at-the-old-town-school-of-folk-music-reach-a-contract/ After more than two years of negotiations, the teachers of the Old Town School of Folk Music have signed a provisional contract with the school board. The agreement, struck Thursday night, will cover the more than 200 teaching artists at the school, which is represented by the Old Town Teachers Organization. Few details have been […]]]>

After more than two years of negotiations, the teachers of the Old Town School of Folk Music have signed a provisional contract with the school board.

The agreement, struck Thursday night, will cover the more than 200 teaching artists at the school, which is represented by the Old Town Teachers Organization.

Few details have been released yet to be ratified, but the new deal includes a 4% pay rise. The teachers also wanted four seats on the board, but it was not known on Friday if that was part of the deal.

Dozens of people working in Chicago’s music industry had supported the teachers in their fight, including Jeff Tweedy of the band Wilco, who was among 70 people who signed a letter of support released in March 2021.

“The road has been long and incredibly challenging at times for many of us,” said Jessica Martino, co-president of the Old Town Teachers Organization.

The teachers “put their hearts into common leadership and brought home a fair contract,” Martino added. “We organized ourselves so that we could sit at the table. We have organized ourselves to ensure we are paid fairly, with access to benefits and job security. We organized because we care about each other, our students, and the Old Town School of Folk Music.”

Founded in 2019, the Old Town Teachers Organization is affiliated with the Illinois Federation of Teachers.

The negotiating team is scheduled to meet next Monday to discuss the terms of the contract. No date has been set for a ratification vote. The preliminary contract runs for five years.

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